Call for papers: ALISE 2016 – Historical Perspectives Special Interest Group (deadline – June 30, 2015)

ALISE 2016, Boston, MA, January 5-8, 2016

Historical Perspectives Special Interest Group Call for Papers

DEADLINE: June 30, 2015

In keeping with the 2016 ALISE Conference Theme, “Radical Change: Inclusion and Innovation,” the Historical Perspectives SIG invites submissions for individual papers, or for a 3+ person panel program that examines the history of radical change, innovators, or inclusion in LIS education. Historical research that explores some of the persistent questions related to pedagogy and educational reform in LIS education is encouraged. If you have something in mind that is not related to the conference theme, we invite you to propose different topics. This call is open to anyone working in the field of library and information science, regardless of occupational label.

In order to make the July 15th ALISE SIG deadline submission, submit 300 – 500 word abstracts in PDF, ODT, or DOCX format by June 30, 2015, to Susan Rathbun-Grubb, srathbun@mailbox.sc.edu or C. Sean Burns, sean.burns@uky.edu.

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Historical Perspectives First Webinar with Daniel Ransom

January 8, 2015 Leave a comment

The ALISE Historical Perspectives SIG is pleased to announce its first webinar. We’ve invited Daniel Ransom, a librarian at Holy Names University’s Paul J. Cushing Library, to give a presentation and invite discussion. Daniel Ransom’s presentation title is:

Blazed Pathways and Skillful Glancing: Using the Lens of Library History to Focus on the New Information Literacy Framework

The session is free to members, who may register at the following address:

Click here to register!

Registration closes at 5pm CST, January 12.

Up to 20 non-members may register. If interested, please contact office@alise.org by January 9, 2015.

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Historical Perspectives SIG at ALISE 2015 #ALISE2015

January 5, 2015 Leave a comment

SIG Session Title: Historical Perspectives of Social Justice Issues in LIS Education and Information

Session date and time: January 28, Wednesday, 4:00 – 5:30pm CST

This year the ALISE Historical Perspectives SIG is co-convened by C. Sean Burns and Susan Rathun-Grubb. The three papers in this session apply historical methodology to examine some combination of information, LIS education, and social justice. The first paper discusses the historical and informational challenges with truth and reconciliation reports. The second two papers use a historical approach to frame social justice and LIS education.

Paper 1:

  • Title:
    • “Truth and Reconciliation Commission Reports as Tools for the Social Justice Agenda in LIS”
  • Presenter:
    • Sergio Chaparro
    • Universidad de Puerto Rico
    • Escuala Graduada de Ciencias y Tecnologías de la Información

Paper 2:

  • Title:
    • “Moving Forward with a Look Back: Examining LIS Education through the Lens of History”
  • Presenters:
    • Liya Deng and Stan Trembach
    • University of South Carolina
    • School of Library and Information Science

Paper 3:

  • Title:
    • “Diversity in LIS Education: Historical and Statistical Perspectives”
  • Presenters:
    • Danny P. Wallace, Reema S. Mohini, and Qiong Xu
  • University of Alabama
    • School of Library and Information Studies

Visit http://www.alise.org/ for more information about this and other sessions. Hashtag for this conference is #alise2015.

Call for Papers — ALISE 2015

ALISE 2015, Chicago, IL, January 27-30, 2015

Historical Perspectives Special Interest Group Call for Papers

Conference Theme: Mirrors & Windows: Reflections on Social Justice and Re-imagining LIS Education

Call for Paper or Panel Presentation — DEADLINE: July 7, 2014

In keeping with the 2015 ALISE Conference Theme, “Mirrors & Windows: Reflections on Social Justice and Reimagining LIS Education,” the Historical Perspectives SIG invites submissions for individual papers, or for a 3+ person panel program that either highlights the history of social justice in LIS education or examines long-standing questions in the training of LIS professionals that have persisted across the last 100 years. This session offers an opportunity to explore the LIS profession’s historical concern with social justice and reform, as well as the enduring questions that LIS educators have yet to fully resolve over the last 100 century.

If you have something in mind that is not related to the conference theme, we invite you to propose different topics. This call is open to anyone working in the field of library and information science, regardless of occupational label.

In order to make the July 15th ALISE SIG deadline submission, submit 300 – 500 word abstracts in PDF, ODT, or DOCX format by July 7, 2014, to C. Sean Burns, sean.burns@uky.edu or Susan Rathbun-Grubb, srathbun@mailbox.sc.edu

Historical Perspectives SIG Session at ALISE 2014

January 15, 2014 Leave a comment

SIG Title: Hidden Connections: Surfacing History in the Book Trade, LIS Education, and
Library of Congress Collections

Session Day and Time: Wednesday 8:30 am to 10:00 am

This year the Historical Perspectives SIG is co-convened by C. Sean Burns and Ellen Pozzi.

Abstract
One of the great strengths of historical research is the ability to unveil non­-obvious connections with our past. Although this panel is composed of three disparate topics pertaining to the book trade, library and information science education, and obscenity and surveillance, all
three topics exemplify this particular strength.

In “Publishers and Price Fixing in Historical Perspective,” Dr. Trudi Abel of the Digital Durham Project argues that the 2013 battle between the United States and Apple, Inc. over a conspiracy to set ebook prices is remarkably similar to an early 20th­century legal challenge in the U.S. Supreme Court over the legitimacy of publishers fixing the prices of copyrighted works. Her argument analyzes Straus v. American Publishers’ Association and U.S. v. Apple, Inc. et al and sheds light on the cultural significance of the price fixing strategies.

In “Shedding Light on the Historical Record: Libraries in Time and Place,” Dr. Jenny Bossaller, from the University of Missouri, will describe the evolution of using and incorporating library history stories in an undergraduate program, a Master’s ALA accredited program, and a doctoral program. Her presentation will focus on the types of histories her students have conducted and the kinds of interdisciplinary content they have used in their research. Furthermore, she will discuss the use of incorporating library history in a variety of LIS courses.

In “The Keeper of the Collections: Regulating Obscenity at the Library of Congress during the Postwar Era,” Dr. Melissa Adler, from the University of Kentucky, will highlight the Library of Congress’ Delta Collection, which was a sample of all the material “seized by the Customs Bureau and the Postal Service,” that was “composed of erotica and items considered to be pornographic or obscene,” and that intended for use as “evidence during the McCarthy era.” Dr. Adler will provide evidence of “an untold piece of the history of sexuality in the U.S. through the lens of the Library of Congress policies and practices.”

Visit http://www.alise.org/ for more information about this and other sessions.

Call for Papers — 2014 ALISE

ALISE 2014, Philadelphia, PA.
Historical Perspectives Special Interest Group CFP
Conference Theme: Educational Entrepreneurship

Call for Paper or Panel Presentation — DEADLINE: July 8, 2013

In keeping with the 2014 ALISE Conference Theme, “Educational Entrepreneurship,” the Historical Perspectives SIG invites submissions for individual papers, or for a 3+ person panel program that highlights the history of educational entrepreneurship in LIS (interpreted broadly). This session offers an opportunity to reveal previously unknown historical instances of times when the field has experimented with educational practice or discussed and entertained various educational theories.

If you have something in mind that is not related to the conference theme, we invite you to propose different topics. This call is open to anyone working in the field of library and information science, regardless of occupational label.

In order to make the July 15th ALISE SIG deadline submission, submit 300 – 500 word abstracts in PDF, ODT, or DOCX format by July 8, 2011, to C. Sean Burns, sean.burns@uky.edu and to Ellen Pozzi, pozzie@wpunj.edu.

If proposing a panel, please also include a brief statement about each presenter.

Thank you,
C. Sean Burns & Ellen Pozzi

Historical Perspectives SIG Program at ALISE 2013

November 17, 2012 Leave a comment

Session Title: Questioning the Past: Finding, Presenting, & Using the Beautiful Answers of Historical Inquiry

 

Session Day and Time: Thursday 1:30 pm to 3:00 pm.

This year the Historical Perspectives SIG is co-convened by Ellen Pozzi and Sean Burns, who are very delighted to have as panelists Drs. Charles Seavey, Jean Preer, and Sharon McQueen.  Our three panelists will discuss some important topics concerning the practice, theory, and relevance of historical methodology in library and information science.

Final Abstract:
For those who want to explore LIS history, but aren’t sure where to start, this panel will provide inspiration. Three diverse LIS historians, Charles A. Seavey, Jean Preer, and Sharon McQueen, will explore the makings of the beautiful questions in library and information history and the presentation and use of the beautiful answers.

Charles Seavey

“Finding the Beautiful Question”

Historical research is not like social science research. While they both involve framing the research question, finding good source material, and reporting findings, historical research has its own assumptions, its own methodologies, and its own way of inquiry.

To help frame historical research within a LIS perspective, Charles Seavey will speak to what it means to do history and will take a close look at the considerations involved, including how to select topics for historical inquiry. He will also address questions about narrative, such as is the story itself compelling, and questions about motivation, such as is there an underlying purpose (e.g., relevance to a current issue or event) on the part of the investigator? Dr. Seavey will also discuss where to find the questions and will speak to the differences between primary evidence and secondary evidence. The story as told in secondary sources (published articles, proceedings, newspaper stories) is sometimes very different from the story that is hidden in archival sources. Examples will be examined.

Jean L. Preer (Indiana University)

“Using the Beautiful Answer”

What is historical inquiry and how is it relevant? For Dr. Preer, history is the cultural capital of a community, institution, or profession, and this is no different for library and information science. Indeed, as libraries continue to assume a greater role as agents of community connection, history can be a tool to foster community identity, enhance public and private support, and provide a basis for future planning. In light of this, Dr. Preer will help show how history can support various purposes.

Sharon McQueen (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

“Presenting the Beautiful Answer”

Like all scholarly research, communication is a fundamental part of sharing and building upon our knowledge. While qualitative and quantitative research presentations often follow fairly standard templates, presenting historical research is different because it involves telling a compelling story using rich, illustrative, and descriptive narration based on a variety of source material. How do you tell such stories? How do you present them to an audience? Dr. McQueen will share her presentation techniques, both performance and technology, that can make historical research compelling and dynamic for audiences of all types. Attendees will learn how to best make use of images, media (e.g. recorded oral interviews, music, and film), presentation technology, and their own talent. Whether you are presenting for a scholarly conference, in the classroom, or for your local historical society, leave the room knowing your audience is as excited about your research as you are!

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